Stanimir A. Bonev

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S.A. Bonev, Associate Professor
(PhD Cornell, 2001)

Department of Physics
Dalhousie University
Halifax, Nova Scotia
CANADA, B3H 3J5

e-mail : stanimir.bonev@dal.ca
www : http://www.physics.dal.ca/~bonev

tel. : +1.902.494.7005

fax : +1.902.494.5191

Theoretical and Computational Condensed Matter Physics

The main objective of my research is to explain and predict new electronic, structural, and dynamic properties of condensed matter systems. This work involves studying a wide range of complex phenomena in interacting many-body systems under diverse conditions. I am using a variety of theoretical techniques, including first-principles electronic structure methods, quantum molecular dynamics, and analytical many-body theories. Students working with me will gain experience with state-of-the-art theoretical methods, and will be exposed to a broad spectrum of problems in condensed matter and computational physics.

In the above figure, we consider the ground state electron density, n(r), of hot, dense hydrogen. This simulation was conducted at a temperature of 1000 K and a density of ~
2.5 x 1023 particles/cm3. The pressure that results under such conditions is on the order of 30 GPa, or roughly three hundred thousand atmospheres. Simulations such as this will generally be run for hundreds of atoms, and times lasting up to 10 ps (1 ps = 1x10-12 s).

Dalhousie University Institiute for Research in Materials